Harvard’s Skewed Sexual Power Dynamic

Print article When I was a high school freshman, I spent many afternoons at my best friend’s house to bake cookies, sew and have “girl talk” with her mom and older sister, who was set to go off to college soon. I still remember hearing the urgency in her mother’s voice when she insisted that her oldest daughter buy more storage, coat hooks and, oddly enough, birth control, before stepping onto campus. She spoke empathetically, as if she knew, probably from her own college years, that her daughter’s uncertain future would include casual sex. Hookups, a sexual act with an intentionally vague definition, increased in frequency in the s with advancements in technology, as automobiles and movie theaters gave young couples a reason to escape their vigilant parents. With the sexual revolution of the s, young adults became even more promiscuous, a shift only amplified by popular culture, as the examples of casual sex in movies and television served as a form of sexual education for some young adults. Today, college campuses nationwide have adopted a “hookup culture,” which embraces sexual behavior outside traditional committed relationships. However, studies have consistently shown that both young people and their concerned parents overestimate how often teens are having casual sex. Hookups are thought to be ubiquitous on college campuses, but this may be a product of pluralistic ignorance, which in social psychology, refers to a situation where a majority of group members reject a norm in private, but go along with it after incorrectly assuming their peers accept it.

Another Study Shows That ‘Hookup Culture’ Is a Myth

At the time, rape was quite clearly regulated in some states: She was saying something far more provocative: No matter the law, certain strategies for gaining sexual compliance are sometimes allowed, and certain people can get away with sexual coercion and violence more often and more easily than others. To understand student experiences, I visited 24 institutions, read hundreds of firsthand accounts of hookup culture published in college newspapers, collected student journals about life in the first year and reviewed the now-extensive work on hookup culture by social scientists, which included survey data summarizing 24, student responses.

A year-old Reddit user hit up the relationship forum asking for advice on what he should do after having a surprise sexual encounter with his male best friend, Danny. Up until this point the college student believed that they were both straight. Does this story have a happy ending?

All opinion section content reflects the views of the individual author only and does not represent a stance taken by the Collegian or its editorial board. These encounters can range from kissing to full-on intercourse. Each of these arguments is valid, but overall, hookup culture seems to have more positive than negative effects. It encourages open discussion of sex, fights double standards, empowers women, and saves time that would otherwise be spent on a full-fledged romantic relationship.

Hooking up is often contingent upon the fact that partners involved will not develop feelings. Hookup culture is sometimes decried for supposedly degrading those involved, especially women. Condoning casual sex might seem to reinforce the idea that a guy can sleep with whomever they want with zero repercussions, while the girl—deemed to be more emotional—must pretend to be fine with his lack of commitment and womanizing behavior. Hookup culture encourages open discussion of sexual needs and desires.

Most would probably say the former. Not only does hookup culture prompt honesty in the bedroom, but it helps eliminate double standards and discourages adherence to outdated social norms. Instead of wasting time on awkward first dates and small talk, two people can skip the formalities and get right to the ultimate test: While this conduct is novel and perhaps atypical, it is more efficient and physically beneficial than adhering to stereotypical gender roles and dating rules.

Speaking of gender roles, hookups can be empowering to women.

Hookup culture

Troy Francis Troy is a game veteran of a decade’s standing, and a lover of women, literature, travel and freedom. He is also the author of The Seven Laws of Seduction. Visit his website at Troy Francis. I recently spent a week in Las Vegas.

Sep 25,  · Hookup Culture: The Unspoken Rules Of Sex On College Campuses Few topics send the media into a panic like the idea of hookup culture on college campuses. But are college students actually having.

Up until this point the college student believed that they were both straight. Does this story have a happy ending? Some background for the situation: We were part of a group of four guys and we all got along really well. Him and his best friend and me and my best friend would all hang out together all the time after school and on weekends, play video games together and go on adventures, you know, just teenager stuff. Anyway, at the end of high school we all went to different colleges across the country for different reasons.

Danny and I both came back to our hometown for the summer, but my best friend and his best friend both stayed at their schools to work and take summer classes and such.

College Hookup Culture and Christian Ethics

It was a sentiment echoed by many conservative commentators whose books and articles I eagerly read, feeling that they affirmed my own feelings and experiences. Looking back on it, though, I can understand why I believed that: I thought that casual sex was degrading because I had felt degraded every time I had it. It was because my hookup partners had treated me like an object, like a means to an end.

A year-old Reddit user hit up the relationship forum asking for advice on what he should do after having a surprise sexual encounter with his male best friend, Danny. Up until this point the college student believed that they were both straight. Does this story have a happy ending?

So naturally, whenever people freak out about college health issues, I turn to the NCHA as the largest-scale long-term assessment of student health behaviors. Percentage of college students who report having 0—1, 2—3, or 4 or more sex partners in the last 12 months, — Fifteen years of data, friends, tells us that about three-quarters of college students report either no sex partner — oral, vaginal, or anal —or just one sex partner in the last year.

Because I know there are lots of questions left unanswered by this graph, I made a few more graphs. Percentage of college men black versus women green reporting zero sex partners — oral, vaginal, or anal — in the last 12 months, — Three things to notice here: For the last year. But there was a gender difference that I think is worth noticing:

Spitting Game

The sex researcher and NYU instructor is behind The Casual Sex Project , a recently-launched website that asks people to anonymously submit their hookup stories. Vrangalova hopes that sharing these stories will help to demystify casual sexual encounters. According to Vrangalova, most media coverage of hookup culture focuses on college students, providing a skewed view of who is doing what, when in their lives they are doing it, and whether these casual sex experiences are harmful.

She told The Huffington Post in an email: There is so much talk about the hookup culture these days, about hooking up completely replacing dating on college campuses and young people in general, about casual sex invading the sexual space and disrupting time honored traditions and norms.

I want to suggest that the rape culture narrative is not only wrong, but completely off the mark. It has been aggressively conflated with what is actually “hookup culture,” and the evidence for this can be found not only in nations with “real” rape cultures, but through examining our own culture as well.

By Joseph Turner June 28, Rape culture has reared its ugly head in the media once again. In no other case has the narrative of a toxic campus rape culture been so compelling. This incident raises the usual questions. Is this horrendous crime symptomatic of a larger social trend? Or is it an aberration, disturbing but with few implications for decent people? But it will help if we zoom out and examine our sexual campus culture as a whole.

Who’s hooking up?

RSS link Few topics send the media into a panic like the idea of hookup culture on college campuses. But are college students actually having more sex than their parents did a generation ago? Research suggests the answer is no. Lisa Wade, a sociologist at Occidental College, says something has changed, though:

A stereotyped but unconscious despair is concealed even under what are called the games and amusements of mankind. There is no play in them, for this comes after work. But it is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things. ∼ Henry David Thoreau, Walden A .

July 16th, The sexual assault epidemic on college campuses is created, in part, by the effects of the hook-up culture. The first in a two-part series. The problem of sexual assault is not new. In the modern college setting, however, the deconstruction of sexual norms, coupled with an “anything goes” mentality, has created a perfect storm for the proliferation of assault. Tomorrow, we will propose some solutions that aim at the heart of the problem—a culture that reduces sexual activities to the level of recreation—but in order to arrive at a solution, we first need to understand the reality of the problem we face.

That as many as one in four—or, at the very least, one in ten—young women have experienced sexual assault sounds so nightmarish. Sadly, rampant sexual assault on campus is a reality that thousands will return to this coming September and that many freshmen will encounter for the first time. Broadly speaking, when we think of rape, one of two narratives comes to mind: Neither of these is a very helpful construction for a serious conversation about sexual assault.

The first scenario represents a very small portion of sexual assaults on college campuses and is by no means unique to campus life. The latter—which is not actually an example of assault—gives cover to those who would explain away all assault as simply a matter of blurred lines and choices regretted in the light of day. The truth is that sexual assault on campus is nuanced and complex.

College Students on Hookups and Relationships


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